Logo Clothing In The News Tagged: logo

Can Your Logo Make Customers Spend More Money?

Image source: Designtaxi.com One of the biggest roles of brand identity is to quickly tell customers what they can expect. When shoppers see the Walmart logo, they know that they can get low-cost products. The Coach logo, on the other hand, is a warning sign that you'd better bring out the big bucks if you expect to buy anything.   Research shows that your logo does so much more than tell customers what your store sells -- it can also make your customers spend more money. All you have to do is show shoppers your company logo and you will dramatically increase the amount of money they spend on average. It sounds too good to be true, doesn't it?   A study by Tanya Chartrand that was published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that exposure to high-quality brand logos encourages shoppers to...

Dressed for Success: Use Custom Clothing to Create a Unique Brand Identity

Image source: Ignaziolaci.com In many ways, the single most important thing that a company can own is its brand identity. Most companies compete against dozens, possibly even hundreds of rivals who are all creating nearly identical products. This is especially true for companies like restaurants or retail stores. How many different burger joints are there spread out across America? They're all making cheeseburgers in some form or another, so why should a customer ever choose one restaurant over another?   That's where brand identity comes in. I'm not trying to say that brand is the sole deciding factor for consumers, but it's definitely important. Brand identity helps to bring in customers with specific objectives or philosophies by appealing to those unique traits. A burger joint that promotes an eco-friendly image with naturally raised animals is fundamentally different from a burger...

Are Small Logos The Future of Branding?

[caption id="attachment_1660" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Image source: Brandingstrategyinsider.com[/caption]   Before we get too far into today's post, you should take a few minutes to watch this rather ridiculous, low-budget marketing spoof.   http://youtu.be/eWN4CyjCM4I   Clearly, marketing companies aren't really thrilled by the all-too-common demand, "Make the logo bigger." But is there frustration really justified? Should logos be subtle and tiny, or are companies doing the right thing when they ask marketers to slap bigger logos onto commercials?   I'm going to answer that question with an analogy. Suppose that you have two men who show up at a party. The first arrives in a Lexus -- classy, elegant, and sophisticated. The other arrives in a $100,000 sports car with rock music blaring and the motor revving. What can you expect the party goers to say about these two men?   Regarding...